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Episode #33 The 5 Practices: An Interview with Peg Smith

Jul 15, 2019 | Podcast | 2 comments

LISTEN NOW…

We want to welcome NCTM Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient and co-author of one of the books we reference MOST OFTEN on this podcast: 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematical Discussions The wonderful Dr. Peg Smith. 

Listen in as we take a deep dive to unpack ALL 5 Practices AND you’ll hear from Peg about the other TWO practices that she often references, Why the 5 Practices are your roadmap to implementing high level tasks, How you can use assessing questions and advancing questions, and How to get STARTED with the 5 practices.

You’ll Learn

  • The origin story of the 5 practices
  • Why the 5 Practices are your roadmap to implementing high level tasks. 
  • How to get STARTED with the 5 practices
  • All tasks are not created equal. 
  • How you can use assessing questions and advancing questions.

MAKING MATH MOMENTS ACADEMY

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LEARN MORE about our Online Workshop: Making Math Moments That Matter: Helping Teachers Build Resilient Problem Solvers. http://makemathmoments.com/onlineworkshop

Thanks For Listening

To help out the show:

2 Comments

  1. Brandi Chammartin

    Hello, just listening to the podcast and I have a question:

    She (and you) mentioned it is important to show students a variety of ways to solve a problem. (Our division has this as well) HOWEVER…for the most part, teachers feel that there are TOO MANY strategies and therefore the strategies only confuse the students. After listening to the podcast – I do realize that as teachers it is important to make sure students have the one strategy down pat before introducing a new one. Question is: HOW? How do you move through the curriculum on time? How can you move from one unit to the next if some kids just aren’t getting it? How? Thx

    Reply
    • Kyle Pearce

      There is a common misconception that more than 1 strategy will “confuse” students, but I believe that the main issue for this misconception is an over reliance on the memorization of steps and procedures. For example, if I’m teaching kids to use (and memorize) a set of steps, then this would be extremely hard for students to do successfully.

      The key to making this a helpful approach for students instead of a hurtful one is to focus on teaching through problem solving and building student conceptual understanding. Every approach can be connected to another and it is those connections we are looking to build rather than the memorization of a list of strategies.

      So, in summary, I don’t think that students should focus on one strategy before exploring another. The key to making use of the 5 practices is to take the strategies that students have thought up (not following the strategies they have observed / copied from the teacher, textbook, or elsewhere) and then in the connection phase tying them together. What connections can be made from the strategies students are sharing in the classroom? Often times, the different strategies build on each other and are not (and should not) be siloed.

      This is a HUGE idea that is hard to communicate in a short email, however it is a common one. Hopefully this helps.

      Kyle

      Reply

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